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called "martin's dream." internees his own journey with dr. king and the legacy -- one of the grid -- the legacy of one of the greatest men this nation has ever produced. a conversation with clayborne carson coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: on this day, when we honor the memory and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr., i am pleased to be joined by dr. clayborne carson, the director of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the
that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
the memory of dr. martin luther king jr. this weekend, we cap off the 10th anniversary week by revisiting our conversation with a civil rights icon in her own right, coretta scott king. back in 2005, we traveled to atlanta for a very special program with miss king at the famed ebenezer baptist church, the church that was home base for dr. king during much of the civil rights movement. a conversation which would turn out to be one of her last on national television. we're glad you could join us to wrap up this 10th anniversary week with a conversation with coretta scott king, coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: as we kick off our second season in 2005, we could
speech while in office the nation celebrates dr. martin luther king jr. and he carried a mantle for a broader progressism including his support of labor unions, social justice trying to eliminate poverty and his vocal anti-militarism. here is dr. king in a sermon where he points to our government for getting involved in the conflict there. >> a nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death. >> john: not a quote you hear too often on dr. king day. here to discuss this with me now is kristal brent zook, associate professor at director of the ma journalism program in hofstra university, she is also the author of three books including "black women's lives: stories of power and pain." and political activist and director of the peace and justice resource center, tom hayden. thank you for your time this evening. when this day was approaching i told the staff on the show i really wanted to do a dr. king discussion about these very topics because martin luther king jr. stood for civil rights,
might say was bittersweet to me because i knew dr. king, i knew him the last two years of his life and i am bitter because of the way that he was taken from us because of hatred in this country. i guess we can start at the beginning because the beginning of the but you were on the mall with dr. king and near the end you are near the mall again 50 years later with a monument that you helped design. >> guest: in between coming back so many times on different occasions to the mall, so it seems like a i lived in washington a short time that had a symbolic meaning for my life and sentimental. every time i come back i have all these memories. >> host: it's a beautiful city. you were 19-years-old in 1963. you were on the mall. the march on washington where dr. king gave that iconic address, i have a dream. how did you happen to go there? >> guest: part of it is i grew up in a small town where there weren't many black people. i think there were three black families growing up in los alamos. so i'd always been fascinated by what was the black community like? i didn't have very much exposure to it
your life and cover new insights as a historian from the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr.. what prompted you? >> guest: it is the 50th anniversary and it is 50 years of mine life of the king legacy and to my coming of age. part of it was to do the to tasks. that my life had been connected to the keying legacy -- king legacy and how king impacted me and i was involved with this amazing journey of editing king's papers. >> host: it is an excellent reid and we are of the same generation and i was also coming of age. it was bittersweet because i knew dr. king he was my mentor. but bitter because the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred. we can start at the beginning the kids you're on the mall with dr. king and at the end you were there again with 50 years later with the monument you help to design. >> guest: and coming back for important occasions. i only lived in washington a short time but the mall had a great symbolic meaning and sentimental. >> host: it is a beautiful city. 19 years ago, the march on washington where he gave the speech i have a dream. how di
as a historian to the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king jr.. what prompted you to write the book this way? >> guest: well, i wanted to write about the martin luther king anniversary and 50 years of my life that came to light and his legacy and life coincides with my coming-of-age. so part of it was to move those two tasks. i felt my life have been connected to the king legacy and yet i felt that there was something about my life that needed to be told in order to understand how king impacted me. and how i got involved in this journey of editing kinks papers. >> host: it's an excellent read and you and i are of the same generation and i too was coming-of-age in the 60s. and the book i must say was bittersweet for me because i guess week because they knew dr. came. he was my mentor and i knew in the last two years of my life in bitter because of the way he was taken from us because of racial hatred in this country and i guess we can start at the beginning he caused at the beginning of your book you are run the mall with dr. came and ere the end of your book you are on the mall again 50 year
came on the first day our nation pauses to celebrate dr. martin luther king junior. dr. king dreamed one day, every man and woman would be treated as equals. he visited a statue of king and also took his oath with one hand on the bible owned by dr. king and at the request, designing the bible. >> the city held a martin luther king junior celebration today and the legacy was bolstered by the inauguration. >> the parade is about more than music. for the family, it's a lesson in diversity. >> we're a community of multipeople people and histories. all to be respected and honored. >> this celebration is believed to be the oldest event in the east bay. >> 200 people filled the auditorium. and honored words of the civil rights pioneer. visible on faces, pride and sacrifices fade more freedom. less williams is one of the living heroes this group thank forward that. >> some youth i think are asking why do we keep sell brailting the past? >> there are two images of dr. king. but young people often see him as just that, a symbol. parents are hoping to change that. it was impossible to miss the
: sorry. it's okay, jon. look, as long as we're celebrating dr. king's birthday, i would like to make one request. can we as a nation please, please stop using martin luther king as a prop in our own petty political arguments >> jon: you mean about race? no, jon. about everything. listen to what the chairman of national gun appreciation day said last week >> i believe gun appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think he would agree with me if he were alive today. >> let me stop you right there. he is not alive today. now what was it that killed him? i don't know, jon. was it diabetes? >> jon: i don't think so sandwich choke maybe? mauled by lions on the porch of a memphis hotel? i don't know. >> jon: i don't think that was it >> you were talking about dr. king. >> he would agree with me if he were alive today. that if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> slavery wouldn't have been a chapter. it would have been oppressive. followed by the chapter en
appreciation day honors the legacy of dr. king. i think he would agree with me if he were alive today. >> let me stop you right there. he is not alive today. now what was it that killed him? i don't know, jon. was it diabetes? >> jon: i don't think so sandwich choke maybe? mauled by lions on the porch of a memphis hotel? i don't know. >> jon: i don't think that was it >> you were talking about dr. king. >> he would agree with me if he were alive today. that if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. >> slavery wouldn't have been a chapter. it would have been oppressive. followed by the chapter entitled all the black people are dead. now who is going to build the country? >> jon: you believe martin luther king would have favored gun control >> absolutely yes jon: why would you say that? on second thought, no, he wouldn't snop okay. why would you say that? >> wait, wait. yeah, he would. i'm just [bleep] with you, jon. i have no idea. how am i supposed to know? dr. king
long people came here to honor the legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr. >> reporter: hundreds of people boarded cal train for the freedom train from san jose to san francisco. it commemorates the alabama civil civil rights march. >> this is for all americans. to get out and enjoy this day and to celebrate and remember the struggles that we all have been through. [ singing ] >> reporter: hundreds of people join said them for a mile and a half march to the gardens. >> celebrating dr. king and celebrating community. that is important. >> reporter: more than a thousand people attended prayer services services and presentations on the life of dr. king. she knew and marched with dr. king. >> very, very nice. he was a wonderful person. wonderful person. non-violent. turning of the cheek. >> reporter: she was one of many african americans turned away that voting both. joining a dangerous protest march. she marched with dr. king on the civil rights march. >> very, very scary and a memorable experience that just doesn't go away. >> reporter: many people said a lot changed but more needs
the life of dr martin luther king on the holiday which honors his life. coming up. the local events in the bay area. and how he was remembered during the presidential inauguration today. >> coming up, the sacramento kings and if there you martin luther king remembered in the warriors game for over 60,000 california foster children, nights can feel long and lonely. i miss my sister. i miss my old school. i miss my room. i don't want special treatment. i just wanna feel normal. to help, sleep train is collecting pajamas for foster children, big and small. bring your gift to any sleep train, and help make a foster child's night a little cozier. not everyone can be a foster parent, but anyone can help a foster child. >> pam: the controversy surrounding a notre dame football star and a girlfriend who never existed. has put online spotlight. karin caifa has tips to help you avoid getting snared by those sweetheart scams. >> maybe if you've heard about this catfishing however, social media has made this a little more common. it is more like phishing... the better business bureau sign that
hot topics by president barack obama during his inaugural address. and more on dr. martin luther king, jr., next. ?o?ooooóññ . >>> this is ktvu channel 2 news at noon. >>> president barack obama marks the beginning of his second term taking his public oath offs and calling on the nation -- oath offs and calling on -- off fist and calling on the nation to act. the historic event also included a specific call to action on a number of issues facing the country tori campbell is live covering the inauguration and joins us with more on the president's speech and the biggest event that is happening right now. good afternoon tori campbell. >> reporter: good afternoon, you can still see a few people behind me inside and at the mall and at the capital building, it was quite a sight, with hundreds of thousands spilling out through the west front of the grass mall allowed them far away from the steps to witness the inaugural address and he talked about a number of issue that were sure to please his base. >> knowing to do so would fail our children and future generations. our journey is not com
which dr. king could not resist, and lyndon johnson couldn't. they were constantly being pushed from below by people who wanted action. johnson becomes president on november 22, 1963. he is an accidental president. he had been in the backwaters of the vice-presidency. heed been drinking too much. he was fat. he was unhappy. he was cantankerous, and he was a forgotten man. martin luther king, on that day, faced a crisis of his own. the civil rights legislation that john f. kennedy finally introduced in june of '63, pushed by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured
the federal government for enacting their own laws. dr. king didn't arrest the state people, he was arrested by them. you're saying the feds are illegal and we want the right to arrest them. that is unking-like. >> you're sounding a little bit like piers morgan screaming at me. >> oh, well, let me say it more silently. you're sounding unking-life. >> the point i'm trying to make is understood, clearly, that the state and the federal government and the ever-increasing authority. and that was unnecessary. >> and that's why you protested states' rights. and what we're saying is the states have a sovereign role here. and the sovereign role is this. if the president of the united states doesn't get it to empower himself with the second amendment says. the states have a role. >> martin luther king said that he was protesting in his famous speech of 50 years ago that concluded with i have a dream. that he was protesting to governors whose lips were drifting with the words of nullification. i'm glad you're using king as if model because it is the antithesis for what you're saying. let me show you wh
at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools and broken down slums, inadequate health care, constant violence, neighborhoods in which to many young people grow up with little hope and peace prospects for the future. >> president obama speaking in 2011 at the dedication of the martin luther king monument on the national mall in washington, d.c. journalist, author tavis smiley has spent the past year criss- crossing the country with activist and professor cornell w
debate. lar larry correia, thank you. >> it's been years since dr. martin luther king gave the "i have a dream" speech. and his niece, alvita king reflects on her uncle's legacy here in . >> mike: and five decades ago, segregation was very much alive in parts of america, a time when a black man couldn't buy a bus ticket at the same window that a white man bought his and couldn't wait for the the bus in the same room as whites and it's important to remember as we do this weekend, the man who led the charge in segregation. >> dr. martin luther king, jr. was a baptist minister from atlanta, georgia. he fought to overturn the jim crowe laws not with violence, but peace. >> we seek nonviolence and passive resistance and still determined to use the weapon of love. >> mike: that was in alabama, where dr. king was leading the montgomery bus boycott to end the days where blacks had to give up their seats for whites, the boycott lasted more than a year until a court put an end to segregation on buses. through the leadership conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the
the charge in segregation. >> dr. martin luther king, jr. was a baptist minister from atlanta, georgia. he fought to overturn the jim crowe laws not with violence, but peace. >> we seek nonviolence and passive resistance and still determined to use the weapon of love. >> mike: that was in alabama, where dr. king was leading the montgomery bus boycott to end the days where blacks had to give up their seats for whites, the boycott lasted more than a year until a court put an end to segregation on buses. through the leadership conference dr. king worked with other civil rights lead towers bring the movement for equality not just for the south, but throughout the nation. >> i still have a dream. >> yes. >> it is deeply rooted in the american dream. >> mike: in 1963, dr. king brought the march to washington and announced his dream for all to hear. >> i have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of this creed. the children who will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. i have
dr. king's with president obama. but earlier, it was that speech. and he defied expectations again. there were specifics on voting, on gay rights, on women's rights, on climate change, on immigration, on gun control. and he defended the big three entitlements. joining me now is democratic senator from ohio, broun. what a speech. how surprised were you at the tone and the specifics in this speech? >> i wasn't surprised. i mean, we had very high expectations for him. he delivered. i loved the line as barney frank and others mentioned from seneca falls to selma to stonewall and i think that says a couple things. it says, one, how we've moved forward as a nation and we should acknowledge that at the inauguration. and, second, it underscores how none of those were easy. you know everything about civil rights and what happens with women's rights and what happens with gay rights. it's always a battle tomorrow that starts. and the president, i like how he is engaged with organizing for action. and i like how he knows that the country is behind him but needs to remind the congress that it's
a national day of service. [cheers and applause] and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question -- what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. but there are as many right answers as there are people in this tent today and people in our country. eva spoke about how her parents inspired her. my parents certainly inspire me every day. but today, when i engaged in a service project with my husband mark, i will be thinking about my grandmother dorothy who started giving back when she was a child. she volunteered in her local school, helping to tutor migrant workers, farm children in southern california, in reading in english and writing. as she got older and had her own children, she provided school trips. she always wanted to cook an extra lunch for someone whose parents could not provide that for them. when she got older still, her children, including my mom, had left the home. she became a big sister to mentor young girls like her who had been neglected and abused as a c
the legacy of dr. king. i think martin luther king would agree with me if he were alive today. >> stephen: yes, dr. king would be pro-gun just as surely as jesus would be pro-nail. [ laughter ] because like mr. ward, dr. king understood that the root of all oppression is lack of firepower. [ laughter ] >> if african-americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country's founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history. [ laughter ] >> stephen: yes! if only america's founders had turned to the people they owned and chained into servitude and said, "here's your gun. use it responsibly." [ laughter ] i guess all larry ward is saying is that america would be a better place if george washington and thomas jefferson had been shot by their slaves. [ laughter ] because he's a reasonable man -- of course, not as reasonable as this debate's sanest voice the motor city madman, ted tugent! who, it turns out, is crazy for tolerance. telling worldnet daily, "there will come a time when the gun owners of america -- will be the rosa parks and we will
, once used by the late dr. martin luther king, flown from atlanta to d.c., hand delivered for tomorrow's ceremony. just how significant are the bibles used during inauguration ceremonies? and a story that weighs in. >>> plus, predicting that the president's second-term poll slice fail. you won't believe the number of folks who say that. we are talking the left and the right. next. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealmaking. you've mastered monkey-style kung fu? no. priceline is different now. you don't even have to bid. master hahn taught you all that? oh, and he says to say (translated from cantonese) "you still owe him five bucks." your accent needs a little work. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is
, as the parade makes its way past. barack obama and the presidency, the realization of the dual dream of dr. king and abraham lincoln. he'll be using those two bibles when he takes the public oath of office, again, all leading to a remarkable day here on the national mall. overnight, the president attended the first event of his second term, a candlelight reception. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. >> reporter: where he addressed the issue everyone in washington has been discussing. >> i love michelle obama. to address the most significant event of this weekend, i love her bangs. >> reporter: hours earlier, at the white house, the second term began, as he took the oath of office, in a private ceremony. the influx of spectators who descended upon washington, to watch obama be sworn in a second time. >> the theme of this year's inauguration, is our people, our future. >> reporter: while the president plans to look to the future, he'll also pay tribute to the past. he'll be sworn in on two bibles. one used by abraham lincoln. an
the president hand on 2 bibles president lincoln and dr. dr. martin luther king jr. and this time it was the president who seemed to swallow a word. >> the office of the president of the united states and will. >>reporter: then the president address. shy of 19 minutes. when the theme of moving forward together. >> my fellow americans we are made for this moment and we will see that so long as we seize it together. together. together. >>reporter: first president ever to include gay in his inaugural while talking about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal then surely the love we dmoyt one another must be equal as well. >>reporter: president insisting we address climate change and immigration arguing we should welcome striving immigrants. >> until bright young students and engineers are listed in our work force rather than expelled from our country there. were powerful performances. kelly clarkson stirring rendition of my country 'tis of thee. ♪ [ singing]. >>reporter: beyonce returning 4 years later this time to sing the national anthem.
of service. [ cheers and applause ] >> and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question. what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. >> chelsea clinton there speaking at the national day of service. monday isn't just inauguration day. also happens to be martin luther king jr. day. and we'll hear from his daughter bernice and find out why she says president obama's second term is actually even more important than the first one. >>> for 29-year-old pushp pushpa basnit, 2013 fleas begins on a high note. she was named cnn hero of the year for her work providing a home for children of incarcerated parents in nepal. i sat down with her after the big moment. how do you feel? you've just won. >> i think i'm dreaming. it's a big honor for me. i will never forget this night in my life. >> what was going through your mind when you were walking up on stage? >> we all are winners, definitely. i've seen my dream come true. thank you very much. i'm still -- definitely this is going
there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will arche some words that martine some more of the martin said and the march i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read
. the "i am a man" part of the memphis sanitation workers strike when dr. king was assassinated. talk to me about that piece. >> it's a text painting by an artist who works with just like that sign that we know so well from the iconic protests. he transforms that into art recognizing that we look at language as a visual thing as well when we take in art. the past is refigured in the present moment. we bring forward the king moment. more importantly, as you mentioned, the memphis sanitation workers strike moment thinking of how we got to where we are. >> it says labor and race and identity. >> yes, it does. >> it's linked to king. it's clearly male, i am a man, it's also, i am human. >> that's right. it's under lined. i am a man. there is that emphasis of what it means to stand tall and be recognized from within and saying i want to be recognized in that way. >> there's a truism that we campaign in poetry and govern many pros. how much of a poet has the president managed to be and how much might you imagine to be a poet into the second term? >> i think, certainly, the president would be the
his legacy live on. i'll have more on dr. king's legacy coming up later in the show. but first, we want to show you -- we want to share your thoughts about dr. king, about his dream on our facebook page. please head over to facebook and search "politicsnation" and like us to join the conversation that's going long after the show ends. if by blessed you mean freaked out about money well we suddenly noticed that everything was getting more expensive so we switched to the bargain detergent but i found myself using three times more than you're supposed to and the clothes still weren't as clean as with tide. so we're back to tide. they're cuter in clean clothes. thanks honey yeah you suck at folding [ laughs ] [ female announcer ] one cap of tide gives you more cleaning power than 6 caps of the bargain brand. [ woman ] that's my tide, what's yours? five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn fro
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 431 (some duplicates have been removed)